26. October 2017

A challenger to PILATUS

So far in 2017, 8484 structures have been released by the PDB based on X-ray diffraction data. Among these, nearly half were determined with PILATUS data. Since film, no detection medium has enjoyed the same kind of popularity. Earlier this year, we celebrated the 10,000th structure in the PDB determined from PILATUS data. We can now announce that you have made PILATUS the second most popular detector in the history of protein crystallography. With a total of 14,315 entries in the PDB, PILATUS has surpassed RAXIS and Marresearch image plates and marmosaic CCDs. Crystallographers know the best technology. We are confident you will push PILATUS across the 50% barrier next year.

EIGER and PILATUS in PDB
Figure 1: Contributions of DECTRIS detectors to PDB entries. The share of PDB entries (in per cent) determined with PILATUS and EIGER data is shown for the years indicated.

 

Or will you? The detector with the fastest rising share in the PDB is no other than our own EIGER. After 40 entries in 2016 (0.4%), EIGER has already contributed 162 entries (1.9%) this year. Just last week, these structures were released by the PDB to be published in high-profile journals:

  • Two structure of agonist-bound D4 dopamine receptor (5WIU, 5WIV) were published in Science. The data were collected with an EIGER X 16M detector at beamline ID-23-B of the Advanced Photon Source.
  • The structure of the TAPBPR-MHC I peptide editing complex (5OPI) will be published in Science. The data were collected with an EIGER X 16M detector at beamline X06SA of the Swiss Light Source.
  • Two more structures of a TAPBRP-MHC I peptide complex (5WER, 5WEU) will also be published in Science. The data were collected with an EIGER X 16M detector at beamline ID-23-B of the Advanced Photon Source.
D4 dopamine receptor in membrane
Figure 2: Structure of the D4 dopamine receptor. The cell membrane is indicated by grey horizontal lines.